teeth-887338_960_720Dentists may no longer be as intimidating as scientists in Melbourne, Australia have published a dental vaccine, which can replace painful surgeries and antibiotics for gum diseases. The validated research published over the weekend in a leading journal stated that a new injection has been discovered, which is seen as a future replacement for gum surgery. This is because it neutralizes bacteria that destroy teeth and gum tissue.

The research said the vaccines reduced the need of antibiotics and surgeries, and dentists may be able to use it in a few years. The vaccine triggers the body’s natural defenses to ensure bacteria are eliminated.

Scientists at the University of Melbourne’s Oral Health CRC, who have been working on the preventive vaccine for gum diseases (or chronic periodontitis) for the past 15 years along with their industry partner CSL, did the research and printed it in the NPJ Vaccines journal on Wednesday. They said their prototype indicated effectiveness in neutralizing a bacterium known as the Porphyromonas gingivalis bacteria, which causes tissue and bone damage. This is done by the vaccines ability to trigger the immune system of the body by targeting enzymes produced by the bacteria to respond to it. Antibodies are produced which then neutralize the destructive toxins released by the bacteria. Therefore, a patient suffering from this bacterium can take this injection to suffer less tissue damage without any further assistance of dentists.

The analysis of the effectiveness of the vaccine was collaborated by groups from Melbourne and Cambridge, USA.

Moderate to severe periodontitis arises in one out of every three adults. It has been linked to diabetes, dementia, heart diseases, rheumatoid arthritis, and certain cancers. The chronic disease leads to tooth loss once the gum tissues amacromodelo-of-teeth-1437437_960_720nd bone supporting teeth are destroyed.

According to the CEO of Oral Health CRC, Professor Eric Reynolds AO, the vaccine would greatly reduce tissue destruction in patients with the disease:

“Periodontitis is widespread and destructive. We hold high hopes for this vaccine to improve the quality of life for millions of people.”

Clinical trials of the vaccine may potentially begin in 2018 on patients that suffer from gum disease.